I ran my first (official) half marathon today! It went really well. I started off running 8 minute miles but was feeling strong after the first five and increased my speed throughout the rest of the race. According to my gps watch, I ran the fastest mile I’ve ever run during the last mile of the race! I guess I probably should have started out faster :D

The picture on the bottom shows pace (green) and elevation (blue)

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stochastastic:

“Our best college students are very good at being critical. In fact being smart, for many, means being critical. Having strong critical skills shows that you will not be easily fooled. It is a sign of sophistication, especially when coupled with an acknowledgment of one’s own “privilege.”… But this ability will not take you very far beyond the university. Taking things apart, or taking people down, can provide the satisfactions of cynicism. But this is thin gruel. The skill at unmasking error, or simple intellectual one-upmanship, is not totally without value, but we should be wary of creating a class of self-satisfied debunkers”

Read this and pass it along to every college student and every parent of a college student you know, then revisit Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness and argue intelligently

As I’ve written before, ours is a culture where it’s so much easier to be a critic than a celebrator. But, in the end, Vonnegut put it best

(via
explore-blog
)

I haven’t observed this at all. I’m a senior in the Aero/Astro engineering program at Purdue University, which is one of the best Aero/Astro programs in the world, and I know a lot of incredibly intelligent students - definitely some of these “best college students” the author talks about. They do have good critical analysis skills, but, for most of them, this rarely comes at the expense of other people. The students that are graduating at the top of our class are kind, caring, helpful, and cautious about believing whatever anyone else spouts out. There are, of course, a few people who use this criticality to take people down, but 1) they’re not at the top of the class and could be called our “best” students, and 2) they are the exception, not the rule.

Being critical of other people’s work is not a bad thing, and anyone who browses the internet regularly recognizes the value of detecting bullshit. There’s a lot of it out there. You just have to be kind and gentle when correcting coworkers and help them reach your quality level. That’s what the best college students at Purdue are doing.

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spaceexp:

The early morning hours of May 6 were moonless when grains of cosmic dust streaked through dark skies near Albion, Maine. Swept up as planet Earth plows through dusty debris streams left behind periodic Comet Halley, the annual meteor shower is known as the Eta Aquarids.
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spaceexp:

The early morning hours of May 6 were moonless when grains of cosmic dust streaked through dark skies near Albion, Maine. Swept up as planet Earth plows through dusty debris streams left behind periodic Comet Halley, the annual meteor shower is known as the Eta Aquarids.

  • Camera: Nikon D600
  • Aperture: f/2.8
  • Exposure: 30"
  • Focal Length: 14mm
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spaceexp:

Earth from the ISS
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spaceexp:

Earth from the ISS

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I just took my last final and I am done with my undergraduate degree! :) I also have a job offer for this summer, so things are looking good.

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quote

Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2):

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

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spaceexp:

Dream Chaser
Source: thegreatlandoni

I saw this vehicle a few times this summer doing taxi tests at Edwards AFB
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spaceexp:

Dream Chaser

Source: thegreatlandoni

I saw this vehicle a few times this summer doing taxi tests at Edwards AFB

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peachandpeony:

Beautiful world we live in

It’s so beautiful! :)

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fstw:

caseyanthonyofficial:

That gazebo is so fucked

Gazebo

Cheetah’s tails are reaction wheels… Cool!

fstw:

caseyanthonyofficial:

That gazebo is so fucked

Gazebo

Cheetah’s tails are reaction wheels… Cool!

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spaceexp:

One Planet Graves
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spaceexp:

One Planet Graves

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I’m looking for a summer internship there and I promise I’m a great engineer! :)

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So… my senior design project is on Fox News.

WHAT?

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Well Tumblr, my senior design project is FINALLY OVER! It’s been an incredibly huge amount of work and I’ve definitely had far too many sleepless nights this semester trying to ‘make ends meet’ for this project. However, I’m really, really proud of what we’ve accomplished. My teammates and I have put together an incredible project. We got to present our project to NASA (they were impressed) and have received nothing but praise from the public. The video above is our final deliverable - it’s awesome, so watch it at least once. You can find our other documents (like our 1100+ page report ) at our website.

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ddaniell:

A Japanese warplane Second World War lies wrecked in shallow water off Guam in a photograph which won Tony Cherbas second in the Topside category. (via)
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ddaniell:

A Japanese warplane Second World War lies wrecked in shallow water off Guam in a photograph which won Tony Cherbas second in the Topside category. (via)

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Our senior design project is in the newspaper, and I’m quoted!

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